iPod gets sudsy, drunken iPadding, and other repair tales

iPod gets sudsy, drunken iPadding, and other repair tales
It's important to childproof your Apple devices - by simply keeping them away from kids.

iPod suffers a spin cycle

  • The situation: An Illinois woman got in touch with us for an iPod repair after her device – which was only three months old – stopped working.
  • What caused it: A trip through the washing machine is what sent this woman's device on the highway to repairsville. When it comes to Apple products, it doesn't matter if the mechanism is three months old or thirty years old – if you put it in the washing machine, it will most likely break. Of course, nobody actually intends to place their Apple devices in the wash, so we simply recommend doing a better scan of your articles of clothing before filling up the washing machine. 
  • The solution: Unfortunately, there is a hierarchy of water damage, and this woman's situation falls right toward the top, which is to say, it's a situation that's pretty dire. Drop your phone in the sink and fish it out and chances are you'll quickly restore functionality, but to subject a device to the brutality of sustained deep water submersion may result in a pretty costly repair.

Maybe don't play with iPad after having a … spirited night

  • The situation: A Texas woman sent her device in for an iPad repair after it sustained a screen crack. Luckily she had the good judgment to send the iPad in shortly following the incident, because otherwise the crack would likely spread, as they are apt to do.
  • What caused it: The woman had three simple words to explain how the iPad got to its present state: "Dad got drunk." It sounds like her dad was having a pretty good night of spirits and iPadding – we imagine him perhaps indulging in a game like 2048 or something – but unfortunately, drink plus Apple products is one cocktail that doesn't mix very well, as evidenced by the device plunging toward the ground from the spirited man's hands.
  • The solution: Because the woman identified the problem early and was proactive about reaching out to us for a repair, the entire process will likely be far less cumbersome than it would have been had she waited and the crack had spread.

Pressure on screen perhaps not a great sign

  • The situation: A Pennsylvania man sent his device in for an iPhone repair because, according to him, the screen was distorting images when pressure was applied to its surface. 
  • What caused it: This problem only surfaces when pressure is applied to the device, such as when it's pulled out of and put back into its case. It's hard for us to know at this point – since we haven't yet carried out a repair – how much of the issue is a problem and how much of it is simply the normal characteristics of the LCD display. After all, LCD screens do by their very nature react when pressure is applied, and there's a certain rippling effect that anyone can cause simply by putting a bit of forefinger pressure on the screen.
  • The solution: We will determine whether the issue warrants a repair or is simply par for the course with the device, and move on from there.

iPhone is not a pacifier

  • The situation: A woman contacted us for an iPhone repair after her device started displaying several different symptoms of malfunction, including charging pins that appeared broken off and what seemed to her to be a battery issue.
  • What caused it: When you're a baby, anything and everything is a toy. And what good is a toy if you can't put it in your mouth? Such was undoubtedly the stream of thought occupying this woman's baby's brain when the young one decided that the best course of action once he had the iPhone in his hands was to determine its flavor. Unfortunately, the kid's saliva came in contact with the charging dock, which apparently resulted in some of the severed charging pins. 
  • The solution: The broad solution to glean from this story is to keep Apple products and infants separate. Sure, both things may be small and easy to carry out, but that doesn't mean they mix well, and the potential for human damage to an Apple device skyrockets as soon as it enters into a room with a little kid.  

Marcelina Hardy

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